Wednesday, 23 March 2011

SEISHIN BIDAN: UKIYO-E OF OGATA GEKKO

Colonel Sato
Count Oyama
SS Akagi
Minister Otori
SS Matsushima
Hosoi Yasoburo
Lieutenant Takemouchi
General Yamaji
Sourced from http://ogatagekko.com

WORKING CLASS ADDICTS: THE OPIUM DEN

Tuesday, 22 March 2011

FIRST NATION IN REVOLT: THE OKA CRISIS 1990

The Oka Crisis was one of many attempts by the Canadian government to halt First Nation land claims by force. The Mohawk blockaded their traditional burial grounds after a development was announced that would build a golf course over it. The situation escalated, first with the Police attempting to arrest the Warrior Society - losing an officer and six cruisers in the process after a fifteen minute gun battle - and then the military, which started a prolonged siege. The Crisis lasted 78 days and was heavily covered by the media, producing some memorable and tense images of the conflict between Mohawk and military.


THE MARK OF CAIN: RUSSIAN PRISON TATTOOS

"And the Lord said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold. And the Lord set a mark upon Cain, lest any finding him should kill him."

The Mark of Cain is a documentary made in 2000 by Alix Lambert, focusing on the various aspects of prison life in Russia; the tattoo, its indelible place in the caste system that separates the Thieves from the bulk of the prisoners and its rapid decline among the prison population. Mostly shot in the notorious 'White Swan' prison outside of Solikamsk, the film highlights the process between sentencing and release, where men are crowded into cells of thirty to forty people with little more than off-coloured watery soup to sustain them.

More interestingly to me, it explores the relation of the tattoos to every day prison life, how it affects ones experience within the system and what the responsibility of certain tattoos entail. It describes the painstaking process of creating a tattoo gun, mixing the ink - made of soot or, if possible, charcoal, and urine - and the various stations one can hold simply by a mark on the skin.

Monday, 21 March 2011

SUITED/BOOTED: GANGS IN THE STH ISLAND


The Road Knights MC actually started out as the Highwaymen way back yonder, but changed their name to the Road Knights in the late 70s. The early Road Knights were very different from the club most people recognize today; for one, it wasn't an all whites club. That came later with their alliance with the Harris Gang (a subject to be expounded upon in later entries), older members dropping off, dying, being imprisoned or simply not agreeing with the direction they younger members were headed.

The original chapter was in Timaru, with three others in Invercargill, Dunedin and Christchurch. There's also a chapter in Sydney, made from the older members who walked when the skinheads became prominent in the Timaru clubhouse. This was the root of many of their future problems; although originally friends with the Epitaphs, the other club wasn't happy about having the Harris Gang around and this developed into a long standing feud.

In the late 80s the Road Knights went up against the Devils Henchmen in Invercargill. At the time, the Road Knights had a lot of sway with the skinheads in the area and could muster nearly triple what the Henchmen could with associates alone. Two Henchmen were killed, one was shot and left in serious condition and there were a series of assaults across town. The Henchmen left town not long after, but like most gangs in New Zealand, the Road Knights were not to remain alone for too long.

They also had a well-publicised war with the Mongrel Mob, with their Invercargill clubhouse burnt down and a few bikes stolen and torched, and the Damned MC, which culminated in Damned associate Robert Holvey being killed outside the prison with an axle. From what I've heard, the Christchurch chapter is now mostly defunct, as new members are hard to come by. As they've found, banning non-whites also narrows the amount of people lining up for patches.



INDIAN COUNTRY: SOF IN VIETNAM